Strange Tales from NY

How to get ahead in classical music in the 21st century, lesson 1. A 60-year-old violinist in the US, Martin Stoner, is apparently suing Young Concert Artists Inc., alleging age discrimination.

YCA offers valuable financial support and career management to several winners annually, but their ages must be between 19 and 26. Stoner, who played with the New York City Ballet orchestra for 25 years before losing his job last year, tells the New York Post that he was allowed to perform in the contest after threatening legal action and grumbling to the powers-that-be about age discrimination. But he was eliminated before the semi-finals. Next, according to that NYP report, he “filed a Manhattan federal court lawsuit against Young Concert Artists and asked the court to delay the semi-finals until he was allowed to participate”…

First, it seems extraordinary that such an organisation would let itself be pressured in this way. In my humble opinion their mistake was caving in, while his was to target them at all.  Young artists organisations exist to help young artists and there is nothing wrong with that.

There are stories of musicians who have made the big time later in life, or built a name as neglected legends etc — but historically that doesn’t usually occur via litigation. If Stoner has enough money to burn on lawsuits, he could spend it better by hiring a venue, schmoozing some managers and critics, hiring some good PR and launching himself by giving the recital of a lifetime or making a knockout CD that will show the world what he can really do.

An autumn note

“For many, the end of this uneasy year cannot come quickly enough”

An ordinary killing

Ian Cobain’s book uses the killing of Millar McAllister to paint a meticulous portrait of the Troubles

Greater—not wiser

John Mullan elucidates the genius of Charles Dickens
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