Lords of the Blog

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The House of Lords Information Committee — nothing to do with the law lords — has just published a fascinating report on communicating with the public.

If Parliament approves its recommendations , people would be able to:

  • watch House of Lords proceedings on YouTube;
  • embed parliamentary proceedings on their websites;
  • watch video recordings of Lords proceedings and read Lords Hansard on the same screen and at the same time;
  • watch Lords divisions from inside the division lobbies;
  • participate in an online debate in parallel to a debate in the Lords Chamber;
  • analyse and re-use parliamentary data;
  • access more information online about Bills and see on the parliamentary website how a Bill has been amended by Parliament;
  • sign up to receive electronic alerts and updates about particular Bills or portions of Bills relevant to their interests;
  • access a list showing which Lords are expert on, or have a particular interest in, which subjects;
  • access parliamentary information in formats that are user-friendly for people with disabilities (including learning disabilities and mental health issues);

Peers would be able to:

  • inform people and the media about their areas of expertise and interest;
  • access a more appropriate room for interviews;
  • see more clearly how a Bill amends previous Acts;

Journalists would be able to:

  • access a list of members who are willing to speak to the media on particular subjects;
  • attend information sessions on the House of Lords; and

Broadcasters would be able to:

  • film in more areas within the House of Lords;
  • show more engaging footage of Lords proceedings;
  • access a list of members who are willing to speak to the media on particular subjects.

Fascinating stuff. Let’s see how long it takes the Commons to catch up.