Books

Kidnapping remains a lucrative business. Anja Shortland’s new book examines how and where it thrives

Free trade is not without costs — but those costs are outweighed by the benefits. And where costs exist, the answer to “open” is rarely “closed”

The lives of Southern Irish Protestants are almost invisible to external observers. A new book of essays sets out to reveal something of them

Imperialism has been a fact of historical life, at all times and throughout the world. So why is the British variety singled out? Jeremy Black has raised his head above the parapet, not so much to defend the Empire as to ponder why it arouses such animosity

Jonathan Rée’s history of philosophy is way too long but worth sticking with for the connections it makes across whole networks of thought

The three lives of Walter Gropius, founder of the Bauhaus

Is Shakespeare ‘accessible’? The truth is that Shakespeare’s plays combine an unusual accessibility of human situation with an unusual difficulty of language

Kierkegaard’s spirit has never been laid to rest. He is the philosopher of angst and dread: the conscience-stricken companion of modern consciousness

A full Brexit would give the UK an opportunity to re-set our relationship with the land and the seas — if the current impasse is resolved so that we are no longer bound by CAP

The radical Jewdas Haggadah provides a rag-week version of the Passover ceremony for pubescent Marxists