anonymous

anonymous

Formerly a successful investment banker, British photographer Marcus Bleasdale has spent the last ten years documenting conflict and human rights abuses in the Balkans, Djibouti and Darfur. But since his switch to photojournalism — which has seen him work with Human Rights Watch and win Unicef’s photographer of the year award — it is work in the Democratic Republic of the Congo that has held a special significance for Bleasdale. It is a place to which he has frequently returned.

From the 1940s onwards the Polish-born Jewish painter Josef Herman (1911-2000) was a significant figure in British art. His path here, however, was a helter-skelter one. He fled his native Warsaw both to escape the authorities (who disapproved of his left-wing activities) and outrun rising anti-Semitism. For six years he crossed Europe, looking over his shoulder at the approaching Nazis and all the while forming a style to match his political views.

In his October Wine column, Saintsbury quotes Dr Johnson on novelties to great effect: “…novelty is always grateful where it gives no pain.” Well, the BBC gave me pain twice this week with its novelties. 

In the aftermath of the destruction wreaked in south-east London in early August, Standpoint contributor Peter Whittle returned to his hometown with photographer Malcolm Crowthers. He found a community torn apart by multiculturalism, one he barely recognised from his childhood.

Read his piece here.

All photographs by Malcolm Crowthers. http://www.malcolmcrowthers.com/

The New York-based British photographer Steve Pyke’s new book is the result of a 20-year project to create a “gallery of minds: a series of portraits of the “Philosophy Tribe”, a community, Pyke argues, “that deserves a wider audience”. The collection is intimate and at times playful, reflecting the close relationship the photographer has built up with his subjects. The personal aspects of the portraits do not constitute “facts, nor reality, nor truth,” says Pyke, “but they are a means that we have created to extend our way of seeing in our search for truth.” As one sitter, Arthur C. Danto, says in the book’s foreword, Steve Pyke is “a master photographer of the soul”. The portraits also appear at the Flowers gallery, London, W1 until October 1.

Catherine Hakim is not a feminist name you will know. She may yet earn the moniker, “anti-feminist feminist”, once bestowed on Camille Paglia, but I doubt it. When you publish a book as risibly unsubstantiated as Honey Money: The Power of Erotic Capital (Allen Lane), being compared to Paglia would be like declaring Katie Price the new Bridget Bardot.

Every day of this year’s triennial week-long Catholic festival in Madrid, Anna Halpine reports from the world’s largest gathering of young people.

Every day of this year’s triennial week-long Catholic festival in Madrid, Anna Halpine reports from the world’s largest gathering of young people.

Every day of this year’s triennial week-long Catholic festival in Madrid, Anna Halpine reports from the world’s largest gathering of young people.

Today’s blog from the Catholic festivities in Madrid sees our correspondent sit in on a presentation of new evangelisation — an attempt to teach “the art of living”.

Read her latest post here