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As the former leader of the Muslim Parliament of Great Britain, Dr Ghayasuddin Siddiqui was uncompromising over the Iranian fatwa imposing the death sentence on Salman Rushdie for insulting the Prophet. When Iran relaxed it in 1998, Dr Siddiqui complained they had no authority to do so. Then came 9/11, and a resurgent, politicised Islam emboldened in its quest to expand its influence in the West.


(Cover illustration by Michael Daley)



By 2005, Dr Siddiqui’s entire outlook had changed: he reflected gloomily that Islam in Britain was on a collision course with the rest of the country. It was, he mused, as if the protection afforded to Muslims to practise and proselytise every aspect of their faith — short of physical jihad — counted for little. Islam seemed to have become all about “rights and no obligations. I think, by and large, this is the direction the Muslim community is taking, leading to victimhood, a grievance culture. We don’t seem to be grasping what makes a people respectable, lovable, likeable. You know, if you are a problem person, who wants to know you?”

How prescient he was. Judging by the reaction to the latest collision between Islam and the values of British society, critical self-reflection still eludes this country’s most politically active Islamic organisations.

Last autumn a survey suggested that thousands of state primary schools had adopted the hijab as part of their official school uniform. Another survey showed that for 42 per cent of Islamic faith schools, including some that are state-run, the hijab was compulsory.

For many Muslim women, the hijab is a modesty garment historically connoting the idea that women are sexual objects for men otherwise incapable of controlling themselves. Responding to these polls, the Chief Inspector of Schools, Amanda Spielman, wondered if little girls were being conditioned to become sexually modest before puberty to ensure they remained modest for the rest of their lives instead of allowing them an unfettered choice when old enough to make an informed decision. Were schools, especially those funded by the state, colluding in this conditioning? Was community peer pressure to conform perhaps contributing to the rise? In which case, said Ms Spielman, Ofsted could give headteachers “the confidence and strength to act”.

Individual freedom is a core British value, and the Chief Inspector is the ultimate custodian of child welfare in schools, so to most people these would seem to be perfectly reasonable questions to explore.

The polls came on the back of Dame Louise Casey’s review into integration, which found that women of Pakistani and Bangladeshi heritage especially face “a double onslaught of gender inequality, combined with religious, cultural and social barriers preventing them from accessing even their basic rights as British residents”. In conversation Dame Louise characteristically puts it more bluntly: “The level of misogyny within some of that community was jaw-dropping.” Or as Churchill might have put it, the influence of Islam “paralyses the social development of those who follow it” because “in Mohammedan law every woman must belong to some man as his absolute property.”
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Trevor
July 14th, 2018
3:07 PM
I would like to apologize if my comment on 12/07/18 caused any offense to Muslims. On reflection, I think that my comments were a bit harsh although I still hold the view that Muslims do make it hard for themselves to integrate into British society even by the clothes that they wear. Logic suggests to me that if Allah is one god and faith in him is fundamental then why should gowns and veils suddenly become an integral part of worship? Also, the rapid growth in crimes being committed by Muslims of all ages and genders suggests to me that the Muslim community is becoming ever more divided and there will come a point where being a British Muslim will be something to ashamed of rather than proud.

Trevor
July 12th, 2018
10:07 AM
I really believe that Muslims are their own worst enemies because of the fact that they complain about (for want of a better phrase) ''being left out'' by wider society but the fact is their form of religion and even their style of clothing creates a barrier between themselves and wider society. Muslim's form of clothing effectively says to non-muslim society, ''we are religiously pious'' and we want to stand out from the rest. When you take into account the anti-social acts being carried out by Muslim extremists, alongside the ones who walk around all day dressed in headscarves and gowns it becomes clear that these people are not only misguided but they are also divided among themselves and this has created a situation in which the gown-wearing Muslims attempt to convince the wider society that we are genuine but the Muslim terrorists are not. I personally believe that it is too late to even try to build bridges because the fact is the damage is done and I believe that a growing number of people are fed up with these Muslims coming to our country and causing problems while putting on a poor show of religious piety.

amcdonald
June 22nd, 2018
10:06 PM
Anonymous believes Tommy Robinson is in jail for contempt of court. At least the BBC gives us 5 meanings to the graffiti on the back of Melania`s jacket! Anonymous can read some truth about the attempt to silence Robinson in Douglas Murray`s book The Strange Death of Europe. In Russia they threw Pussy Riot in jail. The only feminist to speak in solidarity with Robinson is Anne Marie Waters. Theresa May is too busy doing a grovelling curtsy to Royalty on tour. She prefers listening to people with nothing to say. How cheaply decadent can you get ? She tells us there`s a Brexit dividend for the NHS. But absolutely nothing about a dividend for council house building. Where are all our muslims with several wives (registered as single mothers) going to live ?

amcdonald
June 22nd, 2018
5:06 PM
Can you get more culturally disgusting than Shane Allen who runs BBC comedy output? He describes Monty Python as `six Oxbridge white blokes` and John Cleese (twitter) has started kicking him up the arse (metaphorically). Allen cites the disgusting `diversity` argument.. Surely the Muslim Council of Not Great Britain can make a case here too. Like Allen they have no sense of humour either. The `islamisation` of the BBC is well underway. And the BBC is using taxpayers money to fund it! How very `Muslim Brotherhood` of them. There`s no civilisation/free speech where there`s no sense of humour. Islam has no sense of humour and cannot appreciate anyone who has one. Halal Capone Inshallah,innit. Islam thinks it has the equivalent of the `divine right of kings`. Type in `contradictions in the koran` and see what superior intelligence our AI reveals. The hyperobject that is the internet is the ninth wonder of the world.

amcdonald
June 21st, 2018
4:06 PM
ForBritain is my new favourite political party. Anne Marie Waters is in Norwich on 21 July. The fascist `anti-fascists` who protested outside her public meetings are increasing her support. ForBritain is getting my vote. And it`s 100% pro-Brexit. Islam has no intention to integrate. Quite the reverse. Fortunately Brexit has made a politics of truth and intelligence possible. Anne Marie Waters deserves a statue next to Churchill and another one next to the new feminist one.

Anonymous
June 21st, 2018
8:06 AM
Actually Tommy Robinson is in jail for being in contempt of court whilst serving a suspended sentence for - yes, you guessed it! - being in contempt of court

amcdonald
June 17th, 2018
10:06 PM
Would the abolition of the death penalty for apostasy in Islam lead to it`s total collapse, empty mosques and no signs or symbols of Islam anywhere in the world ?

amcdonald
June 12th, 2018
4:06 PM
Zeeshan Ali is free to speak. Unlike Tommy Robinson who`s in jail for speaking his truth. Only Morrissey and Mary Anne Waters dare to speak the truth to and about Islam (see her YouTube vid Dangerous Words,Stockholm etc). The book Beyond Terror by Mary Anne Waters is now available. She`s as good as Camille Paglia and Douglas Murray. It`s also true that the marvellous muslim,feminist artisr Sarah Maple is exhibiting in the Summer Exhibition at the Royal Academy. It`s essentially an exhibition of `Remainia` retro-aesthetica.

Zeeshan Ali, MEND
June 11th, 2018
10:06 AM
Mend (Muslim Engagement and Development) is dismayed by yet another attack by John Ware (“The battle for British Muslims’ integration”, May) and concerned that his misrepresentation of Mend’s actions and intentions is based on cherry-picked facts and is a biased and inaccurate representation of the totality of our work, in line with a preconceived critical narrative. In particular, there is a singular absence of any of the positive work we have undertaken over the past four years. Mend works tirelessly not to make, in Ware’s words, “alarmist claims” but rather to shine a light on an issue routinely dismissed by politicians, newspaper editors and self-proclaimed experts. Ware fails to mention the numerous documents produced by us (all available on our website for anyone, without needing an investigation) that detail presentations, briefing documents, fact-sheets and easy-read guides on numerous topics affecting the British Muslim community. These have been produced for the sole benefit of educating Muslims and non-Muslims on contentious issues, and not to “position conservative Islam in the mainstream”. The only conclusion we can come to as to why he fails to mention them is that considering them would be dissonant with his negative narrative and thus fail his subjective test for “suitable evidence”. Ware also failed to mention the work our volunteers have done and regularly do in fighting Islamophobia. In February, Paul Moore was convicted of attempted murder after he ran over a Muslim woman in Leicester. As reported by both BBC and ITV, it was Mend volunteers who supported her family, pushed for the police to pursue the case and raised media awareness of it. This was a case that attracted national media attention, and we have to ask why Ware did not report this as an example of Mend’s commendable work. Another notable absence was the “Love a Muslim day” originated by Mend’s regional manager that brought together faith and non-faith communities in numerous events across the country. This was in response to a letter calling for violence against the Muslim community. Mend’s “Love a Muslim day” was reported by all mainstream newspapers and a number of independent journalists but seemingly missed by Ware. Aside from Mend’s work, Ware also ignores the many accolades that we have received recognising our work. The World Economic Forum ranked our work as “best practice” in human rights “protection and promotion”; the Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights rated our work as “best example for civil society organisations”; and the EU Parliament magazine stated: “The EU could learn a lot from Mend’s work on counter-radicalisation through engagement.” The WEF, ODIHR and the EU are highly-respected international institutions and it is remarkable that Ware has not cited their considered views on the quality of our work. Tackling all forms of Islamophobia is and will remain Mend’s main objective, and we will keep striving to ensure that racial and religious discrimination is eradicated from society undeterred by sensationalistic accusations. If Ware wishes to criticise Mend’s operation then we do not discourage him. This is to be expected in a healthy democracy, and every organisation is continually evolving and learning from its mistakes. However, biased criticism is rarely informative or useful, and we would expect higher journalistic standards from someone as experienced as Mr Ware. Zeeshan Ali, Media and Policy Analyst, Mend, London E3

Greg Aniol
May 23rd, 2018
4:05 PM
Iftikhar Ahmad - i got your point - to the certain extend .... Why not boys? Boys' problems should be also approached. If they grow up with unhealthy perception of women then definitely should be also educated. I am NOT trying to say that young girls should dress up whatever way. They (as well as boys) should be educated by family and school to respect themselves. However my (and not only my) perception of girls dressed in the cloth bags is not necessary built up on their self respect rather than religion based oppression - tell me if I am wrong. If you are calling few year old girl in the school skirt sexually marked but the other one wrapped with the cloth bag not you must have very disfigured perception of reality and sexuality. Again - religion plays here massive part. Education - to be honest - is a huge problem in the UK. Not schools but parents and overall society is guilty of actions dragging it down. Kids arent encouraged to learn; teachers are scared of pushing them, parents (many of them, not all) do not give a damn, expecting the state to look after their own children. Underachievement ethos guides far too many families. Those families transfer down generation sickening attitude. To summarise - Muslims, Christians or any other imaginary friend followers - as long as not trying to enforce religious rules making others to obey them - let them pray at home to whichever of gods they want. Human decency hasn't been built on sacred books but on common experience built over the thousands of years. Remove religion from the arguments and then not much would be left to argue about. Work hard and don't rely on others to think on your behalf, respect people and have own ambitions. This should cover the most

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