In the magazine this month

October 2014

We owe it to the world to prosecute home-grown war criminals of Islamic State here — not to deny them entry and their victims justice
Until the barbaric murder of David Haines, the government's main response over the summer to the prospect of terrorists returning home-raising the threat level in August from "substantial" to "severe" — seems to have been merely playing with words. Nothing much else was done, other than demanding more details of airline passengers and debating with the Lib Dems over whether returning Islamic State fighters should suffer "stronger locational constraints". For those (and I am one) who consider that the only "locational restraint" an ex-IS fighter should suffer is within a secure prison cell, this seems a woefully inadequate response to the return of "Jihadi John" and the prospect of more Lee Rigbys. However, Mr Cameron's caution is correct: most ideas from the "something must be done" brigade, calling for new laws to "control" these miscreants, are unnecessary. Their demand to stop our own citizens from returning home is legally and morally questionable: on the contrary, what we need is a full-blooded commitment to prosecute all returning IS fighters who are British citizens. This is our duty and we need no new laws to do it.
JULIE BINDEL
Feminist campaigners are outraged by the Law Society's advocacy    of a code that protects violence and enshrines legal inequality
NIGEL VINSON
By allowing misleading party names and failing to prevent ballot fraud, the Electoral Commission has shown that it is not up to the job
JEFFREY MEYERS
The Keeper of the Queen's Pictures and Soviet spy sought out kindred spirits among artists who, like him, had lived double lives
 
JAMES MUMFORD
Catholics in Europe found that if they wanted freedom themselves, they must demand it for all. American Christians should take note
DAVID HERMAN
Abstraction was long seen as the future. But figurative painting has refused to die and the art world is rewriting its own story
ALASDAIR PALMER
Forgotten for hundreds of years, he transcended his time and place to become the most beloved artist of the Quattrocento
 
LISA HILTON
Braving Albania's deadly roads in a vain hunt for a good meal