In the magazine this month

December/January 2016/17

The new President will face huge problems, though he may be the cure rather than a symptom. It is hard to be optimistic about his chances
You know the shot: “We finally really did it,” Charlton Heston contemplating the ruins of the Statue of Liberty. Well, the Statue and what she symbolises will survive the Trump presidency but that scene from Planet of the Apes leapt into my mind as I sat in a Manhattan restaurant on election night with a crowd of startled Republicans, some pleased, some not, watching another compelling drama lurch to a conclusion that most of those there, including me, had not anticipated.
DAVID GOLDMAN
The new President was elected by voters who feel that he is on their side. They are probably right: he will put America back to work    
LASZLO SOLYMAR
The Oxford professor who correctly predicted the end of the Soviet Union now offers his prognosis of America for the next four years
AMICHAI MAGEN
Too many in the West have assumed that the spread of democratic government is inevitable. Can we cope with the authoritarian threat?  
 
TIM CONGDON
For all Vladimir Putin’s military adventures, the Russian economy is now shrinking — far too small to pose a real threat to the West
JONATHAN GAISMAN
Since Tony Blair all but abolished the position of Lord Chancellor in 2005, English judges have been without the champion they need
OLIVER WISEMAN
The anti-politics of Nigel Farage contributed to the referendum result, but it won’t help Theresa May take on Brussels successfully
 
JOHN TORODE

Tony Crosland’s social democratic manifesto is still worth reading. But its author is notorious for his crusade against grammar schools

JULIE BINDEL
Whisky firms have long promoted their liquor as strictly for men, but a new generation of women has embraced the water of life
PAUL JOHNSON AND TYCHO JOHNSON
Paul Johnson, the historian and journalist, talks to his grandson Tycho Johnson about his memories of Ronald Reagan and his hopes for Donald Trump